RRP - £369

Launch Date : September 2016

callaway big bertha fusion review

Recently I have found many players main focus when choosing a new driver is more control rather than more length from the tee. We have had years of brands battling it out for the longest driver title, in some cases even sacrificing accuracy in the process. If you are one of those players who is content with your distance but could do with hitting a few more fairways the Callaway Big Bertha Fusion could be the driver to try. 

In order to create an extremely forgiving driver you need to increase the MOI by moving the weight as low and far back as possible, which is just what Callaway have done here with the 2016 Big Bertha Fusion driver.  

Callaway have been one of the leaders in combining materials since releasing the first Fusion driver back in 2004, and the latest Fusion edition certainly incorporates a wealth of knowledge. The lightweight TriaXial Carbon crown and sole combined with a lightweight Titanium 'Exo-Cage' mean that the weight saved can be re-distributed to other areas of the head where it is needed the most. 

The ultralight TriaXial carbon is 35% lighter than Titanium as well as being much thinner, which means a total of 35 grams has been re-distributed to other areas of the head to increase forgiveness. 

 The ultralight head design reduces the overall weight and increases the MOI to increase control 

The ultralight head design reduces the overall weight and increases the MOI to increase control 

The Big Bertha Fusion incorporates a 460cc head and 12g weight which is placed towards the back of the head, this again helps to increase the MOI for maximum forgiveness and control.

 The 12g weight placed at the back of the head increases the MOI

The 12g weight placed at the back of the head increases the MOI

The triangular shape echoes that of the older FTiz model, but the added matt carbon finish makes it very appealing when setting up to the ball. The shape is certainly different to 'traditional' drivers, but with that said the styling and attention to detail does make it look appealing to all levels of player. Gone have the rough edges of the FTiz, which have been smoothed out meaning the triangular shape is considerably less noticeable and looks much more appealing. 

big bertha fusion driver review golf by josh

As you would expect from Callaway's premium driver the head is fully adjustable giving you the flexibility of changing the loft and face angle to suit the specific needs of your game. The 9.5°, 10.5° and 13.5° degree head options also mean this driver really is suited to all levels of golfer, coupled with the added option of increasing the loft by 2° or decreasing it by 1°

 The adjustability of the head makes it great for players of all levels. 

The adjustability of the head makes it great for players of all levels. 

The UST Recoil and Diamana Redbord are the standard shaft options available with the Big Bertha Fusion which are both lightweight and available in 44.5" or 45.5". This is shorter than recent models, with the thinking behind this being that there will be more forgiveness and control of the club throughout the swing. As with all manufacturers there is also a host of custom shaft options available which you can find on Callaway's website. 

big bertha fusion recoil shaft

Interestingly the shorter shaft which was introduced to gain control also performed extremely well for length, with 30% of the players who tested the Big Bertha Fusion also gaining a few extra yards as well as reduced dispersion rates. 

THE TEST

We tested the 2016 Callaway Big Bertha Fusion alongside 16 handicapper Ryan, who had previously struggled for consistency and accuracy off the tee. 

Josh - PGA Professional

Initially I was not sure on the triangular head design, but the shorter shaft and carbon finish was certainly a confidence boost. It does feel extremely light when you first pick it up, which is what you would expect from the UST Recoil and the Ultralight head design. 

I do produce high spin rates with driver and usually opt for a heavy shaft to help reduce this, but the X-Stiff Recoil did perform extremely well and combined with the Fusion head seemed to produce a lower initial launch than I would expected. I did find my spin rates were slightly up on my current driver and shaft, but this is not a huge negative point for those players who produce slightly slower clubhead speeds. 

The Big Bertha Fusion feels great off the face and my ball speed was slightly up compared to other drivers I have tried recently. It is certainly more forgiving on bad shots, with my dispersion rates noticeably lower than those I was getting compared to the XR16 model. 

In all Big Bertha Fusion is a brilliant addition to the driver market and one I would strongly recommend for those players struggling with accuracy off the tee but don't want to sacrifice too much distance. 

Looks 8/10

Feel 9/10 

Forgiveness 9/10

Overall 9/10 

Ryan - H'cap 16

"I really like the head shape and the carbon finish, I can noticeably feel that the shaft is shorter and lighter but I really like that as it feels like it will be much easier to control. Distance is currently not an issue for me, but control and accuracy is certainly the deciding factor when choosing a new driver."

The Big Bertha Fusion felt great and the lower initial ball flight was something that appealed to me. I did change the setting to slightly closed but kept the loft at 10.5 as that was what seemed to produce the best ball flight for me. 

I don't feel like I have lost any distance at all but the shorter shaft and new head design seem to have made a massive difference to my consistency. The biggest difference compared to other drivers for me is the control, I feel much more in control having a shorter shaft, which is a welcome change from my current driver. 

Looks 10/10

Feel 8/10 

Forgiveness 9/10

Overall 9.5/10

To Find out more about the Callaway Big Bertha Fusion Driver visit WWW.CALLAWAYGOLF.COM

Visit our blog for more reviews, tips & advice or follow us @GolfbyJosh on Twitter and Instagram.  

 

Comment